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The "Jew" in Cinema: From the Golem to Don't Touch My Holocaust

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Januar 2005

Beschreibung

Beschreibung

This absorbing book reveals the ways in which powerful images remained deeply embedded in the creative imagination, even as the circumstances that originally engendered them underwent profound changes. Bartov concludes that some of the fundamental prejudices about Jews, which predate cinema, persisted in cinematic depictions throughout the 20th century, although they have been reinterpreted according to changing political regimes, ideologies, and tastes. Covering a range of traditions and periods, The "Jew" in Cinema provides original and provocative interpretations that often contradict conventional views. Placing cinematic representations of the "Jew" within their historical context, Bartov demonstrates the powerful political, social, and cultural impact of these images on popular attitudes.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

1. The "Jew" as Perpetrator 2. The "Jew" as Victim 3. The "Jew" as Hero 4. The "Jew" as Anti-Hero

Portrait

Omer Bartov is the John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History at Brown University. His many books include Hitler s Army, Mirrors of Destruction, and Germany s War and the Holocaust. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts."

Pressestimmen

In this important work, Omer Bartov examines how the cinematic representations of the 'Jew' as 'perpetrator', 'victim', 'hero' and 'anti-hero' emerge not only throughout the course of film history, but also within a larger cultural practice of stereotyping Jewish identity. His central concern is 'the manner in which the cinematic ''Jew'' reflects the popularization, transformation, resistance to, and reintroduction of anti-Semitic imagery'.--Noah Shenker, Ph.D. candidate in Critical Studies at the School of Cinematic Arts, USCLA"Patterns of Prejudice" (01/01/2009)
EAN: 9780253217455
ISBN: 0253217458
Untertitel: Sprache: Englisch.
Verlag: INDIANA UNIV PR
Erscheinungsdatum: Januar 2005
Seitenanzahl: 374 Seiten
Format: kartoniert
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