From Union to Commonwealth: Nationalism and Separatism in the Soviet Republics

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September 1992



Presenting a broad and timely analysis of the national dimension of politics after perestroika, this book is essential reading for all those seeking to understand the complexities underlying the demise of the Soviet state, as well as the emergence of new states actively engaged in defining their national identities at home and abroad.


1. Introduction Gail Lapidus, Victor Zaslavsky and Philip Goldman; 2. State, civil society and ethnic cultural consolidation in the USSR - roots of the national question Ronald Suny; 3. The impact of perestroika on the national question Gail Lapidus; 4. The evolution of separatism in Soviet society under Gorbachev Victor Zaslavsky; 5. Perestroika and the ethnic consciousness of Russians Leokadia Drobizheva; 6. Nationality policies in the period of perestroika: some comments from a supreme Soviet deputy Galina Starovoiteva.


"Of the many books that emerged from the Fourth World Congress of Soviet and East European Studies Conference heldl at Harrogate, England, in 1990, this slim volume may be the best...It should be read by everyone interested in why the Soviet Union collapsed and what lies ahead." The Russian Review "An excellent and experienced set of authors..." Foreign Affairs "Ideal for graduate seminars...wide-ranging essays place the events of 1985-91 and the rise of ethnonationalism conceptually and historically in the broad evolution of the Soviet Union and the often contradictory phases of policies affecting ethnic nationalities." Joel C. Moses, American Political Science Review "Students of nationalism and of Soviet demise will find the individual contributions in this book useful as an orientation to the subject and valuable for the insights that they provide." Mark R. Beissinger, Slavic Review
EAN: 9780521427166
ISBN: 0521427169
Untertitel: 'Cambridge Soviet Paperbacks'. New. Sprache: Englisch.
Erscheinungsdatum: September 1992
Seitenanzahl: 144 Seiten
Format: kartoniert
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